Forest Trail Academy offers Advanced Placement Courses. Please be cognizant that we offer the courses and NOT the test. You may register directly for the test with College Board at http://www.collegeboard.org/.

AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus AB is the study of limits, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Consistent with AP philosophy, concepts will be expressed and analyzed geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally.

Prerequisites

This is designed to be taught in a full high school academic year. It is possible to spend some time on elementary functions and still cover the Calculus AB curriculum within a year. However, if students are to be adequately prepared for the Calculus AB examination, most of the year must be devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. These topics are the focus of the AP Exam.

Courses Goals

Students should be able to:

  • Students should be able to work with functions represented in a variety of ways: graphical, numerical, analytical, or verbal. They should understand the connections among these representations.
  • Students should understand the meaning of the derivative in terms of a rate of change and local linear approximation, and should be able to use derivatives to solve a variety of problems.
  • Students should understand the meaning of the definite integral both as a limit of Riemann sums and as the net accumulation of change, and should be able to use integrals to solve a variety of problems.
  • Students should understand the relationship between the derivative and the definite integral as expressed in both pads of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
  • Students should be able to communicate mathematics and explain solutions to problems both verbally and in written sentences.
  • Students should be able to model a written description of a physical situation with a function, a differential equation, or an integral.
  • Students should be able to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.
  • Students should be able to determine the reasonableness of solutions, including sign, size, relative accuracy, and units of measurement.
  • Students should develop an appreciation of calculus as a coherent body of knowledge and as a human accomplishment.

AP Calculus AB Course Outline

AP Calculus BC

This is a full-year course in the calculus of functions of a single variable. It includes all topics covered in Calculus AB plus additional topics. Both courses represent college-level mathematics for which most colleges grant advanced placement and credit. The content of Calculus BC is designed to qualify the student for placement and credit in a course that is one course beyond that granted for Calculus AB.

AP Calculus BC is the study of limits, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, polynomial approximations and (infinite) series. Though this is considered a study of single-variable calculus, parametric, polar, and vector functions will be studied. Consistent with AP philosophy, concepts will be expressed and analyzed geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Calculus BC covers topics that are usually included in the first 3 semesters of college calculus.

  • Students should be able to work with functions represented in a variety of ways: graphical, numerical, analytical, or verbal. They should understand the connections among these representations.
  • Students should understand the meaning of the derivative in terms of a rate of change and local linear approximation, and should be able to use derivatives to solve a variety of problems.
  • Students should understand the meaning of the definite integral both as a limit of Riemann sums and as the net accumulation of change, and should be able to use integrals to solve a variety of problems.
  • Students should understand the relationship between the derivative and the definite integral as expressed in both parts of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
  • Students should be able to communicate mathematics and explain solutions to problems both verbally and in written sentences.
  • Students should be able to model a written description of a physical situation with a function, a differential equation, or an integral.
  • Students should be able to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.
  • Students should be able to determine the reasonableness of solutions, including sign, size, relative accuracy, and units of measurement.
  • Students should develop an appreciation of calculus as a coherent body of knowledge and as a human accomplishment.

AP Calculus BC Course Outline

AP Statistics

The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes:

  • Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns.
  • Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study.
  • Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation.
  • Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.

AP Government and Politics: United States

The AP United States Government and Politics course is designed to provide the student with an experience equivalent to a one-semester college introductory course. Students will be expected to move beyond factual recall into the critical analysis of the creation, function, and process of government. As stated in the College Board 2010 course description, this course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics . . . students should become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes.

The AP Government & Politics: United States course provides an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States, This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. political reality.

AP Government and Politics: United States Course Outline

AP English Language and Composition

This course is designed to prepare students to earn college credit in introductory English and to help students develop the critical thinking skills of interpreting, evaluating, and analyzing a text. Students will use writing as a tool for developing and presenting their own understanding of the basic elements of rhetoric, with emphasis placed on developing a mature personal writing style. While this course primarily focuses on non-fiction texts, some short fiction and poetry may be incorporated into the thematic units.

Objectives

As described in the College Board 2010 Course Description:

  • Students will write for a variety of purposes and audiences including an informal journal or discussion pieces. researched essays of argumentation correctly integrating and documenting primary and secondary sources. essays to analyze selected texts for author’s rhetorical strategies and techniques. meta-cognitive reflections on their own development as writers.
  • Students will develop their abilities to write essays which establish an insightful thesis. Develop the thesis with relevant, specific details from a variety of sources. demonstrate a logical organization within and among paragraphs of the essay using repetition, transitions, and parallel structure. use an appropriate, wide-ranging vocabulary. include varied sentence structures. use and maintain an appropriate voice.
  • Students will improve their skills in revision and editing of their own writing, including their abilities to develop a concise and insightful thesis. evaluate the relevance of details for inclusion. revise organization of sentences, paragraphs, or the essay as a whole to improve clarity. modify word choices to make them more effective. balance generalizations about the text with specific details from the text.
  • Students will evaluate a variety of sources for relevance, credibility, and tone. • Students will analyze graphics and visual images as text.

AP English Language and Composition Course Outline

AP English Literature and Composition

*Develop the skills to read critically and evaluate works of literature for

  • Character development and methods of characterization
  • Setting and the influence of time and place on the work as a whole
  • Structure and its contribution to meaning
  • Style and word choice
  • Tone, purpose, and theme
  • Irony, symbolism, and figurative language

*Increase their appreciation of literature in various genres and their understanding of the relationship between literature and the time/culture in which it is produced

*Develop their abilities to write essays analysis and evaluation that

  • Establish an insightful thesis regarding a literary work
  • Develop the thesis with relevant, specific details from the text
  • Demonstrate a logical organization within and among paragraphs of the essay using repetition, transitions, and parallel structure
  • Use an appropriate, wide-ranging vocabulary
  • Include varied sentence structures
  • Use and maintain an appropriate voice

*Develop their skills in comparing and contrasting literary elements and themes in texts written in various genres and from various literary periods.

*Improve their skills in revision and editing of their own writing, including their abilities to

  • Develop a concise and insightful thesis
  • Evaluate the relevance of details for inclusion
  • Revise organization of sentences, paragraphs, or the essay as a whole to improve clarity
  • Modify word choices to make them more effective
  • Balance generalizations about the text with specific details from the text

AP English Literature and Composition Course Outline

AP U.S. History

This course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U .S .history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship.

AP United States History is designed to prepare students for the rigor of scholarship and writing expected in college-level courses. Students study history as a series of interconnected events rather than as isolated dates, learning to critically analyze the cause and effect relationships of those events. As students progress through the course, they learn to find and assess primary documents as well as secondary sources. Finally, students learn to incorporate outside sources into persuasive essays that demonstrate logical reasoning and present evidence to support the author’s conclusions.

AP U.S history Course Outline

AP World History

The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop the greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the nature of changes in global frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. It emphasizes relevant factual knowledge, leading interpretive issues, and skills in analyzing types of historical evidence.

The primary intent of the AP World History course is to teach the history of the world from a truly global stance rather than from the dominant perspective of Western civilization. This approach, therefore, places emphasis on worldwide historical processes and connections among the whole gamut of human societies. In order to achieve a comprehensive understanding of these events, students need both factual knowledge and the ability to critically assess such information. This course helps them on both fronts, teaching the historical facts in the context of how progressive changes–environmental, social, scientific, and political–influenced the various societies they touched, as well as how these groups interacted with each other. Students are exposed to many primary sources in an effort to show them how historical analysis works and how they can proceed to make their own informed interpretations of world events, both past, and present. Significantly, the course is organized by five defining time periods, not by geographical areas. This concept of “periodization” is a vehicle that facilitates seeing both the continuities and changes over time that form the framework for understanding world history.

AP World History Course Outline

AP Chemistry course

This is designed to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to that of a one-year general chemistry college course. Our AP Chemistry course include those topics regularly covered in a typical general chemistry college course, and differ from the usual first high school course in chemistry in respect to the kind of textbook(s) used, the range and depth of topics covered, the emphasis on chemical calculations and the mathematical formulation of principles, the nature and variety of laboratory work done by students, and the time and effort required of students.

Schools’ AP Chemistry courses are typically designed to be taken by students after the completion of a first course in high school chemistry and a second-year algebra course. Students are encouraged to keep copies of their laboratory work for use in determining college credit or placement.

AP Chemistry Course Outline

To resolve your queries regarding the enrollment and the courses, you can contact our Academic Advisor, who is also available on call at 800.890.6269 / 561.537.5501.

*Please note that students must qualify via our academic standards (3.0 cumulative gpa, no plagiarism, etc.) in order to enroll in AP classes.