AMERICAN HISTORY

1.0 Credit
Students in American History are given an opportunity to:
1.) Gain a basic knowledge of events and facts of National and State History from earliest cultures to the present,
2.) Become familiar with the literature of American History,
3.) Develop social studies skills such as map and graph interpretation,
4.) Develop skills in interpretation and analysis of both primary and secondary documents or sources,
5.) Develop historical writing skills.

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WORLD HISTORY

1.0 Credit
World History is a required course for sophomores concerning the nations and peoples of the world. Included with the history and geography are cultural development, political and economic systems and social structures. The student will be challenged to think critically about international relations, human commonalities and differences and their impact on the student’s own life.

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WORLD CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY

1.0 Credit
World Cultural Geography encompasses both the physical and cultural aspects of the discipline. Early emphasis is placed on the development and appreciation of physical geographic knowledge including meteorology, geomorphology and cartography. These skills having been mastered, a cultural approach to the world/s various ethnic regions is addressed during the remainder of the year. Elements including political ideologies, religious beliefs, and unique cultural practices, as well as current situations of the world’s major ethnic regions, are discussed.

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ANTHROPOLOGY

Students acquire an understanding of the differences and similarities, both biological and cultural, in human populations. Students recognize the characteristics that define their culture and gain an appreciation for the culture of others. The content includes, but not be limited to, the following: human biological and cultural origins -adaptation to the physical environment -diversity of human behavior -evolution of social and cultural institutions -patterns of language development -family and kinship relationships -effects of change on such cultural institutions as the arts, education, religion and law.

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AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

0.5 Credit
This course is designed to provide students with a basic knowledge of the purpose, structure, and operation of the national and state governmental systems. The primary content of study is the Federal system and its underlying principles as they are related on National, State, and local levels.

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ECONOMICS

0.5 Credit
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the important relationships of economics to our social and political problems. The course emphasizes the philosophy, development, and operation of our American economic system and its important influence upon the individual and society.

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SOCIOLOGY

Sociology is an elective course designed to familiarize students with various cultures and the problems resulting from people living in groups. This course covers such topics as culture, sub-cultures, social institutions, collective behavior, social change, social deviation, the family, religion, racial and ethnic minorities, poverty, and crime. The latter portion of this course deals specifically with the pressing problems of our society, their causes, and possible solutions.

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PSYCHOLOGY

This course focuses on the study of human behavior. As an introduction to the field of psychology, this course includes consideration of psychological principles, terminology, major theories, careers, methods of experimentation, and practical applications. Special topics include personality development, problem solving, group dynamics, and motivation.

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Criminal Justice is an elective course designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the concepts, processes and institutions of the Criminal Justice system; to provide an understanding and appreciation of how laws work to meet human problems; and how interpretations of laws change to meet the needs of a changing social order. This course will include such topics as the juvenile justice system, courts, law enforcement, careers in criminal justice, corrections, and the background to the criminal justice system.

High School Core Courses and Elective Programs: